Wednesday, February 29, 2012

St David of Wales (c. 500–589)



Saint David (or Dewi, as he is known in the Welsh language) was an evangelist and monk, who became archbishop of Wales. 

He was one of many early saints who travelled around preaching the Gospel, teaching the Faith, and establishing church communities among the Celtic tribes of western Britain. He lived a frugal life, eating mainly bread and herbs. 

David was born near Capel Non (Non's chapel) on the South-West Wales coast near the present city of Saint David. He founded a monastery at Glyn Rhosyn (Rose Vale) on the banks of the small river Alun where the cathedral city of St David stands today. He was buried in the grounds of this monastery, where the Cathedral of St. David now stands, and he was was formally recognised as a saint by Pope Callistus II in 1120. 

During his 2010 visit to Great Britain, Pope Benedict XVI spoke about St David in Westminster Cathedral: 

"Saint David was one of the greatest saints of the 6th century, that golden age of saints and missionaries in these isles, and he was thus a founder of the Christian culture which lies at the root of modern Europe. David's preaching was simple yet profound: his dying words to his monks were, 'Be joyful, keep the faith and do the little things'. It is the little things that reveal out love for the one who loved us first (cf. 1 Jn 4:19) and that bind people into a community of faith, love and service. May Saint David's message, in all its simplicity and richness, continue to resound in Wales today, drawing the hearts of its people to renewed love for Christ and his Church."


St David's Cathedral, Wales




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